Laughter Is The Best Medicine: Our Favourite Smile-Makers

women-laughing

One of the tricks to getting through challenges and changing life situations with aplomb is employing humour! Or, as we refer to it, a healthy dose of vitamin H.

There’s no denying that the symptoms of perimenopause, menopause and post-menopause can present a challenge. Sometimes we’ve got to look on the bright side. Norman Cousins proved this when he discovered Laugh Therapy while struggling with a severe illness. He literally laughed his way back to health via funny movies and books.

menopause-fairy

The Baroness Van Sketch Show

Fashion

Is it perimenopause...is it?

baronness-von-sketch

Click here to watch.

7-witches-of-menopause

Jeff Allen

via MEME

Victoria Wood

Menopause & Health Food Shops​

We hope you enjoyed that. Have you got any favourite funnies you’d like to share?

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

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Post-menopause


This is the time when menstruation is well and truly over, the ovaries have stopped producing high levels of sex hormones and for many ladies, perimenopause symptoms subside.

Estrogen has protective qualities and the diminished levels mean organs such as your brain, heart and bones become more vulnerable. It’s also a key lubricant so your lips may become drier, your joints less supple and your vagina might be drier. In addition, your thyroid, digestion, insulin, cortisol and weight may alter.

At this juncture, a woman might experience an increase in the signs of reduced estrogen but she should have a decrease of perimenopause symptoms. That said, some women will experience symptoms like hot flushes for years or even the rest of their lives.

Perimenopause

Peri = ‘near’

Most females begin to experience the symptoms of perimenopause in their mid-forties. Your progesterone levels decline from your mid-30s but it’s generally from around 40 that the rest of your sex hormones begin to follow suit. 

Perimenopause is a different experience for every woman and some women may barely notice it. The first indicators are usually changes to the monthly cycle. This means that for some ladies, this can be accompanied by things like sore breasts, mood swings, weight gain around the belly, and fatigue as time goes on.

For those with symptoms it can be a challenging time physically, mentally and emotionally.

Importantly, perimenopause lasts – on average – four to 10 years. The transition is usually a gradual process and many women enter perimenopause without realising.