soy protein

Soy is a staple food in many vegetarian diets, particularly in Asia. It has many healthy nutritional properties and is the preferred protein source for women.

Soy Is A Complete Protein

Soy protein is a complete plant protein, meaning it contains all of the essential amino acids that our body cannot make.

Being plant based it is suitable for vegetarian or vegan diets, and the source used for our Shake It Off® protein shake is from non-genetically modified plants (non-GMO).

Soy & Breast Cancer

Some New Zealand and Australian women are cautious about soy due to the fact that it contains isoflavones, which are phytoestrogens (weak, plant based estrogen-like compounds).

High estrogen levels have been linked to breast cancer, so it was thought that maybe soy could also have a link. However, numerous studies show there is in fact a lower incidence of breast cancer amongst Asian women who are consuming the highest levels of soy in the world.

Japanese women, who eat significantly more soy than Americans, have a lower incidence of breast, uterus, and prostate cancers.

breast cancer

Scientific Studies

There has been a lot of research on soy and cancer – below is a brief summary.

In a large meta-analysis (a combined analysis of all available studies) conducted in Japan the researchers concluded:
“This meta-analysis supported the hypotheses that soy food intake may be associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer due to the isoflavones.”

In a large study in Shanghai and a follow-up study the researchers concluded:
“These data suggest that soy foods do not have an adverse effect on breast cancer survival.”

In Western countries, the Washington University published a meta-analysis specifically on soy protein in the International Journal of Cancer Prevention. The conclusion was that regular consumption of soy protein containing foods and beverages may reduce the risk of breast cancer in women by as much as 22%.

The Mayo Clinic also reference endorse soy in this article:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-blog/soy-breast-cancer/bgp-20204055

Web MD have written this easy to read overview, which concludes that soy is safe for women of all ages:
http://www.webmd.com/breast-cancer/features/soy-effects-on-breast-cancer#1

The Cancer Council of New South Wales summarises the research with this guideline:

More studies are needed to examine if phytoestrogens have a protective effect against breast and prostate cancer. From the current evidence, it is believed that a moderate consumption of soy foods (e.g. 1-2 serves of soy foods/day) along with an overall healthy eating plan is unlikely to have adverse effects. This is consistent with the Cancer Council’s recommendations and dietary guidelines to eat a diet rich in plant foods.

Protection from Heart Disease

There has also been a lot of research on soy’s protective effect on the heart. The conclusion is that soy protein reduces low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, elevating HDL and decreasing triglycerides, which reduces the risk of coronary heart disease.

heart disease

The evidence was so overwhelming that the very conservative USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved this health claim for soy:

“25 grams of soy protein per day, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease.”

“25 grams of soy protein per day, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease.” Click To Tweet

Meno-Me® uses only the highest quality non-GMO soy protein isolate for Shake It Off®.

References:

  1. Li-Qiang QIN, Jia-Ying XU, Pei-Yu WANG, Kazuhiko HOSHI; 
Soyfood Intake in the Prevention of Breast Cancer Risk in Women: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Epidemiological Studies
 Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, Vol. 52 (2006) No. 6 P 428-436
  2. Sonia M. Bovapati et. Al.; Soyfood intake and breast cancer survival: a follow up of the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
    July 2005, Volume 92, Issue 1, pp 11–17

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